Eggplant Chèvre Sandwiches

Source: The Parkdale Potluck Cookbook
Made: December 22, 2013
Yield: 4-6 servings
Time to make: 35 minutes.

A melt-in-the-mouth appetizer or snack in which bread is replaced by slices of eggplant.  I really, really like this.

Eggplant Chèvre Sandwiches

Eggplant Chèvre Sandwich

Eggplant Chèvre Sandwiches
1 large eggplant
2-3 medium ripe tomatoes
1 clove garlic
1 Tbsp. olive oil
Goat (Chèvre) cheese

Cut eggplant into 1/3 inch slices. Sprinkle with salt and let sit between two sheets of paper towel for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel the tomatoes and chop finely.
Add a clove of garlic, finely chopped to the tomatoes.
Add olive oil and a pinch of salt.

Slice enough cheese to cover ½ of the slices of eggplant.

Remove the eggplant from the paper towelling and pat dry.
Cook on barbecue or grill until light brown.
Brush with olive oil and continue cooking until golden.
Remove to a cookie sheet  and place it back on grill where it can keep warm.

Spoon tomato mixture onto half of the eggplant slices. Add a slice of goat cheese.
Top with another slice of eggplant. Serve as soon as cheese has softened.

 

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Tagine of Moroccan Vegetables with Couscous

Source: May All Be Fed: Diet for a New World
Date tried: July 25, 2017
Yield: 4-6 servings
Time needed:1 hour

This is a delicious and quite an impressive dinner fit for company.
In spite of the long ingredient list, it is fairly simple to make.

Tagine of Moroccan Vegetables with Couscous

Tagine of Moroccan Vegetables with Couscous
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 medium onions, sliced
1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced into 3/4” strips
2 garlic cloves, peeled
1 tsp. turmuric
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp fine sea salt
14 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp crushed saffron threads (optional)
4 medium carrots cut into 1” lengths
1 butternut squash, pared, seeded and cut into 2” pieces
1 15-oz can unsweetened tomatoes
1 cup vegetable stock, vegetable bouillon or water
2 medium zucchini, cut into 1” chunks
1 cup cooked garbanzo beans
1/2 cup raisins

3 cups water or 2 cups vegetable stock or vegetable bullion with 1 cup water
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp fine sea salt
1 1/2 cup whole wheat couscous
1/2 cup coarsely chopped almonds, toasted

In a large saucepan, heat 2 Tbsp oil over medium heat.
Add onions and cook, stirring often, until lightly browned (6-8 minutes)
Add bell pepper, garlic, turnuric, ginger, cinnamon, salt, cayenne and saffron.
Stir for one minute.

Stir in the carrots and butternut squash, tomatoes with their juice and vegetable stock.
Bring to a simmer over high heat, then lower heat and cover.
Simmer 20-30 minutes until vegetables are just tender.

Stir in zucchini, garbanzo beans and raisins.
Cover and continue to simmer another 5-10 minutes.

In a separate saucepan, combine oil, salt and water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Stir in the couscous and remove immediately from heat.
Cover and let stand until couscous has absorbed all the liquid. (about 5 minutes)

To serve, place couscous in a warmed serving platter.
Make a well in the centre of the couscous.
Using a slotted spoon lift vegetables from liquid and set in the well.
Pour tagine cooking liquid over vegetables and couscous.
Garnish with toasted almonds and serve.

Button Soup

Source: Whole Foods for the Whole Family
Date tried:June 30, 2017
Yield: 16 servings
Time needed: 3-4 hours

Although it would take even longer, this would be a great dish to do in a slow cooker. The name comes from a children’s storybook which includes a variation on the Stone Soup tale. In this one a miser is tricked into making soup for a whole town with just a button, so the contributor’s children named this “button soup”. The long, slow cooking makes for beautifully tender stewing beef as well as a great beef stock.

Button Soup

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Peasant Soup

Source: Ecological Cooking
Date tried: March 1, 2014
Yield: 8 servings
Time needed: 90 minutes

Prior preparation needed:
Soak beans overnight or bring to boil, let cook a few minutes, cover and let stand one hour before proceeding with recipe.

This soup brings back memories of my childhood, especially those days when Daddy decided Mum deserved a day off and chose to make supper for us.  We always looked forward to Daddy’s suppers.  He was no great chef; he didn’t try anything fancy, never followed a recipe or even did a special shopping, so far as I can recall.  Just looked in the cupboard and fridge and started putting things together in a stew pot.  More often than not it was some sort of macaroni stew.

Peasant Soup

Peasant Soup

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