Ocean’s Blueberry Orange Muffins

Source: May All Be Fed: Diet for a New World
Date tried: April 1, 2018
Yield: 1 dozen muffins
Time needed: About 50 minutes

In the introduction to the bread section of May All be Fed: Diet for a New World we learn that Ocean Robbins, son of John Robbins, began a bakery business when he was just 10.  I am sure his customers really enjoyed these muffins.  I know I did. In fact they were so good that by the time I remembered to take a picture, there was only one left.

Blueberry Orange Muffin

Ocean’s Blueberry Orange Muffin

Ocean’s Blueberry Orange Muffins
1 1/2 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
1/3 cup canola or safflower oil
1/3 cup pure maple syrup
2 Tbsp. raw tahini
grated zest of one orange

2 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
1 cup rolled oats
1 tsp nonaluminum baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. fine sea salt
1 cup fresh or (thawed) frozen blueberries.

Preheat oven to 350oF. Lightly oil a muffin pan or pans with oil.

In a medium, bowl, whisk together the orange juice, oil, syrup, tahini and orange zest.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, rolled oats, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
Add the liquid mixture and combine using as few strokes as possible to moisten all dry ingredients.
Fold in the blueberries.

Spoon batter into muffin pan, filling each cup about 3/4 full.
Bake until a toothpick inserted in centre comes out clean. (20-25 minutes).
Let muffins stand for 5 minutes before removing from pan.

Apple Walnut Pancakes (with Fruit Syrup)

Source: More-with-Less Cookbook
Date tried: March 24, 2018
Yield: 4 servings
Time needed: 30 minutes

These are a real treat, and what better topping for apple pancakes than apple fruit syrup?

Apple Walnut Pancakes with Fruit Syrup

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Chechebsa

Source: The Recipe of Love
Made: September 10, 2013
Yield: 2-4 servings
Time to make: 20-30 minutes.

The simple flour and water dough is kneaded and then fried like bannock before being crumbled and drenched in butter and honey for a simple, but satisfying dessert.  One might call it Ethiopian popcorn.

Chechebsa

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Elisha’s Apple Cinnamon Muffins

Source: The Parkdale Potluck Cookbook
Date tried: August 9/16
Yield: 2 dozen
Time needed: 45 minutes

These are one of the staff-created variations on the basic muffin recipe used by Alternative Grounds, a popular fair-trade coffee roasters in Toronto. Sadly they no longer operate the restaurant where these muffins were served each morning, but the coffee is still available at various local outlets.

This is a very good muffin, moist and tasty. Good call, Elisha!

Elisha's Apple Cinnamon Muffins

Elisha’s Apple Cinnamon Muffins

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Cheesies

Source: Recipes for a Small Planet
Date tried: April 22, 2014
Yield: 40 cheesies
Time needed: 25-30 minutes

A homemade version of this popular snack. It is very much like a cookie—a sort of baked cheese ball. I will have to give this recipe another try as it did not turn out as well as I hoped.

Cheesies

Cheesies
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/2 cup sherry
1/4 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 egg
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp. each onion powder, garlic powder & paprika
2 cups whole wheat flour
2 Tbsp. oil
11/2 cups sesame seeds, ground
walnut or pecan halves for garnish (optional)

In a bowl, mix grated cheese, sherry, Worcestershore sauce, and egg. Be sure the cheese is well separated, not in a limp.
Stir in salt, seasonings and flour. Knead lightly.
Add oil, and knead again.
Knead in the sesame meal 1/2 cup at a time.
Preheat oven to 400oF.
Pinch off pieces of dough and roll into small balls about the size of a large marble.
Place on an unoiled baking sheet.
Flatten them gently with a finger. Press a walnut or pecan half into each, if you wish.
Bake for 10-15 minutes.

Variation: replace seasonings with 1/4 tsp. cayenne for a spicier version.

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Pancake, Waffle or Camping Bread Mix

Source: Recipes for a Small Planet
Date tried: July 12, 2013
Yield: 6 ½ cups
Time needed: less than 10 minutes

Baking mixes are always handy.  Here is a high-protein mix for using at home or while camping whether you want pancakes, waffles or bread.

Pancakes from RSP mixPancake, Waffle or Camping Bread Mix
4 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup soy flour
2 Tbsp. baking powder
1 Tbsp. salt
½ cup non-instant dry milk (or 2/3 cup instant dry milk)

Stir these ingredients together and store in a tightly-covered jar or can.  Pack into a plastic bag for camping.

To use, take 1½ cups of this mix and add:
1-2 eggs (or powdered eggs)
2 Tbsp. oil
2 Tbsp. honey (or sugar)
Water or milk to bring batter to desired consistency.

Water and powdered eggs alone will produce a good campfire bread.
Use the oil and honey as well for pancakes or waffles.  A thicker batter makes good pancakes, a thinner batter is best for waffles.

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Being Creative with White Sauce

Like the author of this site I learned how to make a basic white sauce in a home economics class more years ago than I care to count.  Can’t say I was much impressed then.

But when I began to realize how variable this simple recipe can be and what a scope for creativity it offers, it became very interesting indeed.

Every part of the recipe can be modified for different uses.

The fat component can be melted butter, lard, shortening, margarine or any sort of oil. Gravies are a “white sauce” in which the drippings from the roast form the fat component.

The starch component is usually wheat flour, but can be potato, soy, barley or rice flour.  Corn starch and amaranth flour are the choices for making a clear sauce.  They have more thickening power than other flours, so use half as much per cup of liquid.

The liquid component is usually milk, but can just as well be water, broth, tomato juice, or fruit juice or a blend of several of these.  A touch of white wine is great in a sauce for seafood.  A clear sauce using fruit juice as the liquid makes a nice pancake topping. A clear sauce made with chicken broth and soy sauce often completes an Asian stir-fry dish.

Then there are all sorts of things one can add to a white sauce: vegetables, meats, cheese, tomato paste, peanut butter, a whole assortment of herbs and spices, and ,for sweet sauces, fruit, chocolate, sugar, honey or other sweeteners.

So, where do you use white sauce?  Virtually everywhere.

  • Cream soups (celery, mushroom, potato, squash, broccoli, whatever takes your fancy)
  • Cheese sauces for macaroni and cheese, to pour over vegetables.  Include beer in the liquid and you have Welsh rabbit.  (Which most people now know as Welsh rarebit.)
  • Curries (basically a curry sauce is a white sauce with the appropriate spices added)
  • Creamed chicken, tuna, etc. to be served over toast, polenta, or rice
  • Casseroles (substitute your own white sauce for canned soup)

Whatever the additions and modifications, a white sauce is basically a combination of fat, starch and liquid cooked to get a thick sauce. With that in mind, many apparently daunting recipes, like Bean & Noodle Casserole, resolve themselves into “Make a white sauce and ….”
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