Date and Nut Bread

Source: Ecological Cooking
Date tried: April 25, 2012
Yield: 3 loaves
Time needed: 3 hours, but most of the time is for rising and baking, not prepping.

Most dessert breads are quick breads, but this is a yeast bread yet it does not call for any kneading. I think this is an oversight, even though the instructions say the batter will be sticky when put into the loaf pans. In any case, I did skip kneading and I was not pleased with the results. It tasted fine, but it really did not look good at all.

Date & Nut Bread

Date & Nut Bread

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Hot Spice Apple Oatmeal

Source: May All Be Fed:Diet for a New World
Date tried: November 9, 2012
Yield: 4 servings
Time needed: 10-15 minutes

You may have guessed by now that I love hot oatmeal, as long as it is made with old-fashioned rolled oats. It’s a great way to start the day. You can have it plain or fancy according to taste, mood, and what’s on hand. This vegan version calls for dried apple slices and apple juice as part of the liquid.

Hot Apple Spice Oatmeal

Hot Apple Spice Oatmeal

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Banana Pancakes

Source: The Parkdale Potluck Cookbook
Date tried: July 7, 2012
Yield: 4-6 pancakes
Time needed: 10-15 minutes

You can tell from the list of ingredients that this contributor to the Parkdale Pot Luck Cookbook regularly has vegan ingredients on hand.  If you haven’t tried rice milk or carob chips yet, now is your chance.  Don’t have time to shop for them?  Just use your regular milk and chocolate chips.  Butter, margarine or a light vegetable oil can replace the coconut oil but won’t give the same delightful flavour.

I made these rather thick and hearty this morning, but if you prefer a thinner, lighter pancake, just adjust the quantities of flour and rice milk to get the desired consistency.

 

Banana Pancakes

Banana Pancakes

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Boston Salad

Source: 12 Months of Monastery Salads
Date tried: January 11, 2016
Yield: 6-8 servings
Time needed: 20-30 minutes

I love Boston lettuce and was pleased this year to find some available in January—though in a high-priced “living salad” container. Usually I only find it in the summertime. Ah well, for a new recipe, I decided to try it, especially as I tend not to buy oranges in the summer when we have so much local fruit readily available.

This is a lovely salad and I am especially impressed with the dressing. Since it is best served at room temperature, no extra time needs to be added for chilling.

Boston Salad

Boston Salad

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